Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
Steven Johnson
Publication Date
October 2010
Riverhead Hardcover
In Where Good Ideas Come From, Steven Johnson pairs the insight of his bestselling Everything Bad Is Good for You and the dazzling erudition of The Ghost Map and The Invention of Air to address an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen? Answering in his infectious, culturally omnivorous style, using his fluency in fields from neurobiology to popular culture, Johnson provides the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of how we generate the ideas that push our careers, our lives, our society, and our culture forward.
Beginning with Charles Darwin's first encounter with the teeming ecosystem of the coral reef and drawing connections to the intellectual hyperproductivity of modern megacities and to the instant success of YouTube, Johnson shows us that the question we need to ask is, What kind of environment fosters the development of good ideas? His answers are never less than revelatory, convincing, and inspiring as Johnson identifies the seven key principles to the genesis of such ideas, and traces them across time and disciplines.

The book is really about innovation, as the above Amazon description says, however it's a really great insight into what makes organizations creative and innovative and what stymies this happening. Apart from Johnson always being a good read, it provides a very useful way of analyzing problems in organizations, which is good for service designers.

Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
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